Notes on Art

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EVII-Sub at Uaxactun, Guatamala, Maya Epi-Classic, 100-250 c.e.

This 27-foot radial (four sided) pyramid contains staircases on all sides flanked by large masks. The structure’s primary orientation is to the east and is used as an annual calendar, with the sun rising directly behind the facing buildings on solstices. EVII-Sub was built to celebrate the completion of the solar gods, the radial plan being derived from the Maya glyph for the sun (k’in). All radial pyramids symbolize cyclic completion. The masks display the crocodilian earth, the solar deity, the sky deity and the sun deity.

Solar cycle completion rituals were introduced to the Maya from Teotihuacan in Central Mexico, the largest city in the world at the time. The city ruled Tikal and Uaxactun and traded in all directions. They introduced atlatl (spearthrowers) which were a technological advancement over regular spears.

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EVII-Sub at Uaxactun, Guatamala, Maya Epi-Classic, 100-250 c.e.

This 27-foot radial (four sided) pyramid contains staircases on all sides flanked by large masks. The structure’s primary orientation is to the east and is used as an annual calendar, with the sun rising directly behind the facing buildings on solstices. EVII-Sub was built to celebrate the completion of the solar gods, the radial plan being derived from the Maya glyph for the sun (k’in). All radial pyramids symbolize cyclic completion. The masks display the crocodilian earth, the solar deity, the sky deity and the sun deity.

Solar cycle completion rituals were introduced to the Maya from Teotihuacan in Central Mexico, the largest city in the world at the time. The city ruled Tikal and Uaxactun and traded in all directions. They introduced atlatl (spearthrowers) which were a technological advancement over regular spears.

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